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Library Guides

English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies: Getting started

Discover the books, journals and other resources that you will need for your studies

Welcome

Welcome to the guide for English, Linguistics and Cultural Studies. This guide will help you to discover the books, journals and other resources that you will need for your studies. Use the tabs above to find further information for your specific subject.

To find out the latest information on the Library Services, FAQs about the physical library spaces and information about our click and collect service (starting on 14th September) please visit our dedicated Library Guide to the Online Delivery of Library and Archive Services. 

Find Your Library (CURRENTLY CLOSED)

Image of street sign that says Little Titchfield Street W1​

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Your main Library is Regent Library and it is located at Little Titchfield Street.

  • The Library Counter/ Information Desk is on Floor 1.
  • The book collections are across three floors: Floors 1, B2 and B4.
  • There are computers and printers on Floors 1 and B4.
  • The self-service machines for borrowing and returning books are on Floors 1 and B4.
  • There is WiFi access throughout the building.

You can also access the other University of Westminster libraries based at New Cavendish Street, Marylebone and Harrow

What do I need to use the library?

Image of University of Westminster ID card

 

 

 

 

 

 

You will need your University ID card for:

  • Entrance to all University buildings
  • Printing & photocopying
  • Borrowing library books, DVDs and laptops
  • Your IT username is w + first seven digits of student ID​

 

Getting started with your reading list

What's a reading list?

To help you get the most out of your learning, your lecturers will provide you with a reading list for each module. Your list may contain different types of sources, such as books, articles, podcasts, videos and websites. You will use your reading list to prepare for each week of your modules and to find sources for your exams and assignments.

Where will I find my reading list?

The best place to find your reading list is on Blackboard. Each of your modules will have a Blackboard site. Look for the "Reading List" link in the left hand menu to link to your online reading list. You can also find your online reading list at http://readinglists.westminster.ac.uk. If your module does not have an online reading list, ask your lecturer.

What should I do if I cannot access items on my reading list?

  • Ask a member of Library staff at your home library information desk.
  • Contact your Academic Liaison Librarian.
  • Let your Lecturer know that you are having difficulty accessing items on the list.

Academic Liaison Librarian

Jennifer Yellin's picture
Jennifer Yellin


If you are unable to find an appointment slot to fit your timetable, please feel free to email me directly and I will arrange an alternative timeslot where possible.
Contact:
Regent Campus Library
University of Westminster
4 - 12 Little Titchfield Street
London
W1W 7UW
0203 506 9618

New books

The Vampire in Contemporary Popular Literature

This book explores the "new vampire" as a literary trope, offering a comprehensive critical analysis of vampires in contemporary popular literature and demonstrating how they engage with essential cultural preoccupations, anxieties, and desires.

Medievalism in a Song of Ice and Fire and Game of Thrones

This book explores Martin's and HBO's approaches to and beliefs about the Middle Ages, and how those beliefs fall into traditional medievalist and fantastic literary patterns.

Gothic Forms of Feminine Fictions

This is a study of the powers of Gothic in late 20th-century fiction and film. Susanne Becker argues that the Gothic, 200 years after it emerged, exhibits unchanged vitality in our media age and its obsession with incessant stimulation and excitement.

Shakespeare and Feminist Theory

This book shows how many kinds of feminist theory help analyze the dynamics of Shakespeare's plays.

London in Contemporary British Fiction

This volume creates a framework for new approaches to the representation of London required by the unprecedented social uncertainties of recent years: an invaluable contribution to studies of contemporary writing about London.

She-Wolf

She-Wolf explores the cultural history of the female werewolf, from her first appearance in medieval literature to recent incarnations in film, television and popular literature.